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Методические подходы к анализу финансового состояния предприятия

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Сопоставление инфинитива после причастия II с инфинитивом в составном глагольном сказуемом




Упражнение

Переведите следующие предложения, обращая внимание на ин­финитив в составном глагольном сказуемом:

1. Many substances are known to dissolve in hot water.

2. A substance which is known to dissolve in acids may
not dissolve in water.

3. The substance reported to dissolve in hot water was
thoroughly tested.

4. This substance is reported to possess the property of
radioactivity.

5. Substances thought to possess the property in question
were thoroughly investigated.

6. The eclipse of the sun was predicted to occur in 1460.

7. The eclipse of the sun predicted to occur in 1460 took
place at the exact moment foretold.

8. This was the cubic equation which was believed in
ancient Egypt to be insoluble.

9. The question is how closely these data represent the
results likely to be obtained in practice.

3 Зак. 105 65


10. The following particulars have been selected as those
most likely to be useful in judging and criticizing the work.

11. The postulates of the theory are of fundamental
importance, and are likely to form the nucleus of future
theories of the structure of molecules.

12. In 1886, the Allis Lake Laboratory, a privately
supported institution and said to be the first fresh-water
biological station in this country, was established in Wisconsin.

28. Повторениеинфинитивов и инфинитивных оборотов

Упражнение

Переведите следующие предложения, определяя инфинитивные обороты и функции инфинитивов:

I

1. The radius of our orbit is believed to be increasing
very slowly.

2. The copper to be refined is cast into large plates.

3. This property allows the alpha particle to be detected.

4. The source is so weak as to add comparatively few
additional counts above the background.

5. There appear to be two distinct effects in this case.

6. Electrons can be made to travel at very high speeds.

7. The idea of nuclear charge and atomic number is now
realized to be most important.

8. The cooling is effected by methods to be discussed in
the next chapter.

9. A certain period of time must be allowed for the oil
drops to be removed by the electric field or by precipitation.

 

10. There appears to be direct evidence of the existence
of negative electrons in matter.

11. The distance d was calculated from equation 1—25
and found to be 2.814 Angstroms.

12. The best agreement is to be found in the case of
carbonic acid.

13. In our discussion the nucleus will be taken to be
at rest.

14. We may suppose the alpha-particles within the nucleus
to be in motion.

15. Ordinary objects are not likely to move with a velocity
approaching the velocity of light.


16. The lithium nucleus is too small for so many collisions
to occur.

17. Secondary radiation may be expected to rise when
the primary radiations are observed.

18. Light is to be considered as some kind of wave motion
of electromagnetic origin.

19. There is no reason for the conversion of mechanical
into rediated energy to be continuous.

II

20. Alpha-rays were shown to be identical, no matter
from what radioactive element they are emitted.

21. There is no definite molecular weight to be ascribed
to water when in a liquid state.

22. Pitchblende was shown by X-ray and emission
examination to have been a mixed salt.

23. It will be necessary for the observer to remain in the
dark at least ten or fifteen minutes to accustom his eyes to
the darkness.

24. In liquids and solids the movement of molecules must
be supposed to be more restricted.

25. One may consider the charge-exchange reaction to
have been established under these conditions.

26. Radium appeared to be an element, whose salts were
found to be isomorphous with the corresponding salts of barium.

27. The proportion of colouring matter to be mixed with
a body depends chiefly on the effect to be produced.

28. The nucleus of every atom is assumed to contain
enough protons to account for the nuclear charge.

29. At first the alpha-rays were thought to be undeviated
by the magnetic fields.

30. As information accumulated, it became possible to plan
experiments that were likely to yield the material sought for.

31. During the Dark Ages people believed the Earth to
be flat.

32. All circumstances likely to affect the accuracy of the
measurements should be carefuly observed.

33. Samples of two ores from a region known to be
geologically very old have ages close to 2000 million years.

34. When a current is said to be flowing from the positive

3* 67


pole of a battery towards the negative pole, actually electrons are running in the opposite direction.

III

35. To test for a soluble iodide one adds to a test tube
containing the solution to be tested, one cubic centimeter of
carbon disulphate, and a few cubic centimeters of chlorine
water and shakes the mixture vigorously.

36. To maintain a constant temperature in a small or
large container was for years and still is a very important
technical problem because most precise physical and chemical
experiments require the temperature of the object to be
constant at the moment when the readings or any other kind
of observation are made.

37. The speed of the particles (about ten thousand miles
per second) is a bit too swift for us to study in detail.

38. Any metal will displace another metal, occupying a
lower position in the activity series, from a solution of any
of the salts of the second metal, provided that the metal to
be displaced is not very far above hydrogen,

39. The equilibrium methods of measuring relative
activities allow the substance whose relative activities are to
be measured to come to equilibrium and to determine the
conditions of the equilibrium.

i 40. We consider the hotness or coldness of any body to depend on the quantity of heat possessed by the body.

41. Ions have been found by numerous experiments to
move as easily through a jell as through the liquid solution.

42. One of the main objects of experiments on mesons
has been to determine whether the properties of the particles
found in cosmic rays fit the predictions of the meson theory
started by Yukawa.

43. Galacturonic acid was shown by Hagglund and his
colaborators to be present in the sulphite liquors from pine
wood.

44. A body with total kinetic energy reduced to zero
would not be able to transfer heat to any other body and
might then be said to be at the absolute zero temperature.

45. With an increased production of uranium in recent
years interest in uranium steel is reviving again and its


outstanding properties make it seem likely to earn for itself a favourable position among special alloy steels.

46. For the growth to continue steps must be formed
gradually at ordinary temperature.

47. We must discuss the actual values of — x for contacts
between metals and insulators, and see whether they are
likely to be small enough for any current to pass.

48. To begin with a simple example, let us in the first
place, without troubling about velocity, consider the question
of the number of molecules which on the average are to be
found in a definite volume of element W.

49. The streams of ionized particles assumed to be emitted
at the time of flares and to excape sometimes from the solar
atmosphere and reach the Earth, giving rise to sudden
magnetic storms, also have velocities of the right order.

50. The condition for the rays SA and SB to reinforce
each other on reuniting at P is that their light paths differ
by an integral number of wave lengths.

 

51. It is quite common to use the so-called probable
error, or the error for which there seems to be an even
chance of existing in the case of anyone observation.

52. In astronomical subjects it is customary to print to
a high contrast in order to render visible details likely (or
even certain) to be otherwise missed.

 

53. The theorists were not sure whether what the observers
considered to be the brightest stars in a galaxy were actually
stars.

54. In the present discussion observations of declination
have been accepted as likely to provide the best representation
of the sun's liongitude.

55. The discussion of too many details and special cases
does not seem to be desirable, since it is likely to obscure
the fundamentally important points.




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